Summer Corn Soup with Crisp Prosciutto

I loved this soup. It is a great way to use the tasty Manitoba corn available right now. I took this recipe from Fine Cooking’s “Cook Fresh” cookbook.

The book mentions to resist the temptation to remove husks at the store. The husks keep the corn fresh and moist.

photo 2 (1)

 

3 very thin slices prosciutto
3 or 4 large ears fresh corn
4 tablespoons unsalted butter
1 medium yellow onion, chopped (about 1 1/2 cups)
Kosher salt
2 cups homemade or lower-salt chicken broth
1 1/2 cups medium-diced peeled red potatoes (from 2 to 3 medium)
Freshly ground pepper
2 tablespoons coarsely chopped fresh basil

1. Position a rack about 4 inches below the broiler and heat the broiler on high. Arrange the prosciutto in a single layer on a small baking sheet and broil until it begins to curl, 1 to 2 minutes. Flip the prosciutto and broil until it appears dry-crisp and has curled a bit more, about 1 minute. Let cool, then finely chop or crumble by hand; set aside.
2. Slice the kernels off the corncobs for a total of 3 cups corn. Reserve the cobs.
3. In a medium Dutch oven over medium heat, melt the butter. Add the onion and cook until softened and slightly golden, 5 to 7 minutes. Season with a generous pinch of salt.
4. Add 4 cups water, the broth, potatoes, 1 1/2 cups of the corn, the cobs and 2 tsp salt. Bring to a boil. Reduce the heat to medium low and simmer until the potatoes are tender, 10 to 15 minutes. Remove from heat and discard the cobs.
5. Working in batches, carefully purée the soup in a blender, transferring each batch to a large heatproof bowl or large liquid measuring cup.
6. Pour the puréed soup back into the pot. Add the remaining 1 1/2 cups corn and bring to a boil over medium-high heat. Reduce the heat to medium low and simmer, stirring occasionally, until the corn kernels are tender, 3 to 5 minutes. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Garnish each serving with the crisped prosciutto and basil.
MAKES ABOUT 8 CUPS
SERVES 8 AS A FIRST COURSE
170 calories per serving

HOW TO CUT CORN OFF THE COB
Removing corn kernels from the cob can be messy – they like to bounce off the cutting board and end up scattered all over the counter and floor. To keep those kernels in their place, insert the tip of the ear of corn into the center hole of a Bundt pan. Cut the kernels away from the cob in long downward strokes, letting them fall into the pan.

photo 1 (1)

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